Thursday, 30 July 2015

First sale of A1 Edition of "Two Light Waves" North Anglesey


An existing collector based in Southern France has made a special effort to come to my gallery to buy not one but two of my Limited Edition landscapes before the price rise on August 1st. The first image she fell in love with was "Two Light Waves" (North Anglesey) and this is the first A1 version of this image to sell here at the gallery. The other image was "Reflecting on an Intimate Day" Aberffraw. 

If anyone else fancies an A1 Edition print then please call the gallery on 01248 715511 with your image choice before August 1st. 



Wednesday, 22 July 2015

"Scene at the Bare Cave" DPS in August edition of H&E (Health & Efficiency) Magazine

The very long running (115 years) Health and Efficiency Magazine for naturists, is running a series of my "Landscape Figures" images as double page spreads in their monthly magazine.

This 10th DPS in the August edition out now, features "Scene at the Bare Cave"



"Scene at the Bare Caves"

"Most of my images have featured the individual in relation to their natural environment, but this most recent image contains three nude figures, creating a narrative (or narratives) which should be open to interpretation by different viewers. 


For me as the artist I was fascinated by these naturally occurring caves in huge sea cliffs, caves which really look as though they are dwellings not geological formations. In the early evening sunlight, naked, vulnerable human beings emerge from the caves and revel in the heat of the sunlight and the warmth of the rock of their environment. It was as if I were watching a wildlife programme whilst observing my naked volunteers in this imposing cliff landscape. I like that the rock separates each of the figures, so that they'd be almost unaware of each other, but in the lower caves a man and a woman make a loving connection albeit fragile, whilst in the higher cave a lone female looks towards the light and companionship." 

"Landscape Figures" explores the relationship between organic human figures and a notional 'wild landscape'. 

For Glyn the landscape has always been more important than photography itself but for over three years now he has spent much of his time on a project exploring fragility of the human form in wild landscape, but also the sensuous relationship of the human to that environment.

“Although the nude is vital to the project and integral within the images, the images are not just ‘nudes’ – they are landscapes and stories. In a way they are just simple, beautiful, dreamlike visual questions”

Visit the Nudes in Landscape gallery at www.glyndavies.com to purchase a signed fine-art print of this image, or to commission Glyn to create a similar photograph of yourselves.

"And then there was Man" DPS in July edition of H&E (Health & Efficiency) Magazine

The very long running (115 years) Health and Efficiency Magazine for naturists, is running a series of my "Landscape Figures" images as double page spreads in their monthly magazine.

This 9th DPS in the July edition out now, features "And then there was Man" which received an Honourable Mention in the 2015 International MONO Awards



"And then there was Man"

From the 'Genesis Set', within the "Landscape Figures" project. The third in a series of six images loosely connected to Adam & Eve. There was a tree, and then there was man.

"Landscape Figures" explores the relationship between organic human figures and a notional 'wild landscape'. 

For Glyn the landscape has always been more important than photography itself but for over three years now he has spent much of his time on a project exploring fragility of the human form in wild landscape, but also the sensuous relationship of the human to that environment.

“Although the nude is vital to the project and integral within the images, the images are not just ‘nudes’ – they are landscapes and stories. In a way they are just simple, beautiful, dreamlike visual questions”

Visit the Nudes in Landscape gallery at www.glyndavies.com to purchase a signed fine-art print of this image, or to commission Glyn to create a similar photograph of yourselves.

Saturday, 18 July 2015

A first copy of my A1 Edition of "And on the Third Day" purchased by a lady vicar

No.3 of 30 of the A1 Edition of "And on the third day" from my Landscape Figures project has just been purchased by a very wonderful lady vicar, having seen it last year at my exhibition at the Oriel Ynys Môn. She has not stopped thinking about the image and what it means to her at so many levels, so today came in especially to make the purchase.

This is the first large print of this image I have sold but this image is very special to me too, and indeed No.2 of 30 hangs on my own wall at home. No.1 is still available at the usual higher price for the keenest collectors.

Of course, as always, this image is also available at the slightly smaller A2 size, still as a Limited Edition, but also as an A3 signed but non-limited print. See WEBSITE for details. The Facebook prudishness censored version is below


Friday, 10 July 2015

First Flight to Museum of Modern Art, Wales

I'm delighted to announce that my image, "First Flight" has been selected for the Tabernacle Art Competition exhibition at MOMA Cymru / Wales in Machynlleth (www.momawales.org.uk). I'm particularly pleased as the gallery is predominantly associated with contemporary painters, drawers and sculptors so it's nice to see photography embraced within the 'art' remit.



“The universe is full of magical things patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper” is the title of the competition taken from ‘A Shadow Passes’ by Eden Phillpotts, 1918. I read the poem carefully and felt my image absolutely fitted the brief.

I have found that the only real way to feel utterly connected to landscape is to be naked, sensuously engaged with it, to be able to feel the wind and rain on your skin; to sense the changing warmth of the sun, and cool of the shade; to feel the earth between your toes and the roughness of the rock. In all, to become acutely aware of our organic nature, our vulnerability in wild places, we need to ‘see’ the truth of our surroundings. We need stripping of all forms of protection in order to heighten our awareness. 

First Flight is a visual analogy of the sentence in “A Shadow Passes” - ‘But one needs a lens to judge of their beauty: it lies hidden from the power of our eyes’ - it’s only when we ‘feel’ the landscape that we ‘see’ the hidden and not so hidden elements within it. 

In this image, a volunteer who is a young single mother, climbs a mountain for the first time and for the first time removes her clothes in public to be photographed – two comfort zones have been dramatically crossed, yet her elation was ecstatic, she had seen and realized something about herself that she never knew existed, she feels liberated and freed and has since taken her young daughter back to the summit to show her what ‘Mummy’ experienced. I feel this image is so apt in relation to Phillpotts’ poem.

Final winners will be announced during the show which runs from this Saturday until 3rd Sep. 2015

Sunday, 28 June 2015

"Sudden Exposure" Carneddau, suddenly gets exposure!

Just 24 hours after selling the first A1 Edition of "Snowdon Magic" ( 1 of 30) , I have just sold the very first in the A1 Edition of "Sudden Exposure" Carneddau (1 of 25).

These No.1s in an edition of 3ft x 2ft A1 prints are priced at £1450 which shows there is once again sensible movement in the market, even here in rural North Wales which surely means that photographers elsewhere must be feeling the change in trying to earn a living from print sales.

"Sudden Exposure" Carneddau © Glyn Davies 2005

Snowdon Magic - First A1 Limited Edition just sold

"Snowdon Magic" is an image I took at the summit of Yr Wyddfa (Snowdon) one evening last year whilst waiting to shoot a night image for a client, has sold several prints in the smaller sizes already but yesterday, the first of the largest, A1 Edition has just sold and it look fantastic in the dark brown frame the customer selected for it.

All good timing for the customer, for as from August 1st 2015 my A1 Limited Edition print prices will be raised in the direction of my pre-recession prices from three years ago.


© Glyn Davies 2014 - All rights reserved

Friday, 22 May 2015

Dark Clouds in Blue Skies - insecurity when there's no need - my speech for JMT

This time last week, after a fresh and tasty fish lunch, washed down with a fine dry white at Carlos Beach Bar in Portugal, I lay down on a wonderful beach bathed in 33º sunshine, alongside my beautiful partner Jan and looked up at a clear blue sky whilst listening to the sound of the waves crashing upon the golden sands whilst Plovers and Sanderlings twittered to each other across the wet shoreline. We poured a G&T that we’d kept cold in the cool-bag, and to all intents and purposes life couldn’t get any better; but a small dark cloud was always overhead, a cloud Jan knew was there but she couldn’t actually see it for herself.

Photo courtesy of © Kevin Lelland at JMT.
Six months earlier I had received a phone call from a gently spoken but very persuasive Stuart Brooks, Chief Executive of the highly regarded and influential John Muir Trust, a Scotland based conservation charity dedicated to protecting Britain’s wild places. They own and care for some of the UK's finest wild landscapes. He informed me that I had been “highly recommended” by several people as being “THE man” for their first ever AGM to be held in North Wales, an area they are very keen to start having more involvement with. I was asked if I would consider being their keynote speaker at the Galeri in Caernarfon, which they had booked exclusively for the weekend event.

Now I haven’t done any major talks for a long time, several years in fact, so whilst I was honoured to have been asked, especially when many other eminent speakers had gone before me including mountaineer Simon Yates and Allison Chin, President of the Sierra Club, I was in equal measure filled with trepidation. Stuart asked me to think about it and I tried to find 'get-out' support from friends and family but they all said how fantastic it was to have been asked and that I would be amazing etc, not the answers I had hoped for. Jan said, before I could get a word in, how proud she was of me! My close friend Ken Latham, mountaineer, countryside manager, mountain rescue volunteer, rock climber and keen amateur photographer just said “Nice one matey, you’ll be fookin ace!” He volunteered to check out the audiovisual set up for me at the Galeri as I was about to head abroad. He came back to me with “Mate, it’s the D*gs Boll***s, your stuff looks fookin incredible on their 2K projector” – so that was it really, no more excuses and I confirmed my acceptance to a delighted Stuart.

Thereafter, faint dark vapours twisted above everything I did, even during Christmas and January Cornish breaks and weekends away with my Cariad. The vapours became a mist and the mist became a fog, which was all utterly stupid and unnecessary, made up of insecurity and lack of self-belief even though I knew that my actual work would certainly speak for itself. Sitting at the poolside table in Portugal with my laptop, I spent a whole day editing and re-editing the order of the images I’d finally chosen to illustrate the talk which was titled “There's Spirit in the Landscape”. Gradually, when the sequence started to make sense, to have a flow, to create a story, but a story containing narrative within the individual images, I finally started to relax a little. Within a couple of hours I had also created bullet points for the important points I really should mention and the dark cloud started to thin.

I have never, ever written a whole speech having always chosen instead to 'wing it' talking candidly, honestly, and fluidly, from the heart, on the spur, about a subject so close to me but without the basic rudiments of content to be covered it’s all too easy to forget critical or interesting background. When I read more about the nature of the JMT and about what their aims are, I realised that my latest book “Welsh Light”, (well at least the foreword to that book), was almost entirely relevant, a kindred voice about the importance of preserving the remnants of Britain’s wild places for the emotional and spiritual wellbeing they can bring and for the nature benefits they offer us. I felt that there was no point in re-inventing the wheel so I selected extracts from my book and decided to include them in my talk. I now knew that my worry was about running out of time during the talk, rather than how to fill the time but the biggest worry perhaps unsurprisingly was how many people would be there, would they find it fascinating or boring, would they heckle or applaud and indeed all the usual worries that anyone probably has before going in front of a large group of the public.

We arrived in Manchester, to find drizzle at midnight, as we’d been warned - the metaphorical dark clouds now a wet a sombre reality - but when I awoke the next morning the sun had come out and I found I was surging with positivity. Ken helped me in the gallery and we double-checked that the new iZettle card payment system was working ready for the talk as we’d be selling books and maybe some prints, and everything seemed to be going smoothly. We loaded the van at 4.00 pm and by now my adrenalin was kicking in to numb my nerves and if I wasn’t mistaken, I was almost feeling excited! We arrived at the Galeri and I met the lovely and helpful Iona Sutherland the membership secretary, who had already seen a preview of an initial draft selection before I’d left for Portugal and who'd loved the images and found my descriptions inspiring and thought provoking. I felt at ease when I saw her and she reassured me that everyone was looking forward to the talk after a great day in the Welsh hills with their guides.

I met technician at Y Galeri, Ian, in the auditorium and he and the sound engineer did audio and visual checks with me and for the first time I could see just how impressive their system was, full colour fidelity and sharpness (for a massive screen) and a crystal clear sound system. They had set up a podium, spotlights and even a jug of water on a glass table for me. It all felt very professional and having seen just how good my images would look on their screen, all my nerves disappeared (helped with a pint of larger I think) “At least I know the subject well enough” I thought to myself!

The crowd of approximately 130 eager guests filed in and took their seats, in respectful hushed tones and I was warmed to see several friends, family an professional colleagues sitting amongst the audience. I felt a surge of support and friendship and suddenly felt utterly relaxed, so much so that soon after I'd received a glowing and reverential introduction by Stuart Brooks saying they knew as soon as they’d checked out my web links and portfolio, that "I really was their man” for this critical first AGM in Wales I felt elated and positive. I thanked the two most important people outside of the JMT, who had persuaded me to do the talk in the first place, my partner Jan and my friend Ken, before launching into a passionate speech about the JMT, my love of Wales and its landscape, the importance of wild places, the potential destruction from industry and development, the need for us all to fight for areas of outstanding natural beauty. I knew I didn’t need my note sheets at all anymore. I read extracts from my book and was told later, (even by those who have read my books already), that my words were especially inspirational and moving when heard from the author's own mouth. The extracts led straight into a slideshow of 48 of my Welsh landscapes which not only gave me a chance to chat passionately about my feelings at the time, and my reasons and thoughts behind taking the pictures, but also gave the predominantly Scottish audience a visual whistle-stop tour of some intrinsically Welsh places to whet their appetites for future visits.

45 minutes raced by in what seemed like 15 and I received wonderful, loud applause from the audience before opening up a Q&A session. I was genuinely relieved by the intelligence of the questions, questions that showed acute attention to and astute interpretation of what I had been saying during my speech. Thankfully I don't think I heard one question about what camera I use, which is always heart-warming as it means the audience are more interested in my thoughts than the box that takes the picture. We did discuss subject, rationale, vision and execution - the process from initial observation through to final print, but this made for good discussion, as integrity and reasoning throughout the process is far more involved and intellectual than the topic of which brands I use.

After the talk and a superb thank you from a genuinely inspired CEO, (who told me quietly later that his degree was in fine art!) I met with a large throng of well wishers in the bar, one of whom, a super bright and gentle Scottish lady said, “That was the BEST lecture I have EVER been too” and then bought a signed copy of my book ☺ I chatted for almost ¾ of an hour with guests and sold many more signed books before finally packing the van and heading for the Liverpool Arms in Menai Bridge where my friends had already lined up drinks for us and who celebrated with a euphoric Glyn until 3.00 am!

My confidence has been fully restored and I will endeavour to never again let such dark clouds build up before a talk, especially when lying on a fabulous beach with a beautiful woman in gorgeous sunshine, 1000s of miles from home.

Thanks to everyone who came; to the JMT; to everyone who gave me support even if they couldn’t come; thanks to the Galeri staff; the organisers; my closest friends and some of my family; thanks to some fantastic colleagues and customers who made extraordinary efforts to attend, and thanks most of all, to my wonderful and proud Jan, who has suffered my tension these last few months but who has never faltered in bolstering me even when I was creating dark clouds in her blue skies!

Tuesday, 19 May 2015

"Caved In" Spread in June edition of H&E (Health & Efficiency) Magazine

The very long running (115 years) Health and Efficiency Magazine for naturists, is running a series of my "Landscape Figures" images as double page spreads in their monthly magazine.

This 8th DPS in the June edition out now, features "Caved In" Portugal



“The contrast between the sharpness of the huge rocky cliff and the delicate fragility of the female form in this image creates a tension – not just from the fear of cuts and slices from the knife-like edges, but also due to the apparent melancholy of the woman within such colourful sunlit surroundings. You’d think she was a modern day cavewoman but really, as summer draws close, she represents a wide-held feeling or sadness about returning home after the universal joy of travel, sunshine and warmth, We all dream about our next naked adventure in the great outdoors before we have even finished the present.”

Visit the Nudes in Landscape gallery at www.glyndavies.com to purchase a signed fine-art print of this image, or to commission Glyn to create a similar photograph of yourselves.


Wednesday, 13 May 2015

THIS SATURDAY! My keynote speech for the John Muir Trust, Galeri, Caernarfon

There's Spirit in the Landscape
Keynote Speech by Glyn Davies for the John Muir Trust

Galeri, Caernarfon, 8.00pm Saturday 16th May

An annual theme for the keynote speech for the Scotland based John Muir Trust, a UK conservation charity dedicated to protecting wild places. They own and care for some of the UK's finest wild landscapes. Speakers have previously included mountaineer Simon Yates and Allison Chin, President of the Sierra Club, but for their first ever AGM in Wales, an area they hope to become more involved with, I am humbled to have been asked to give this year's keynote speech! Humbling and nerve-wracking, but as it's a slideshow talk of 48 of my own images, at least I should know the subject well enough :-)





For all ticket and booking enquiries, please deal direct with the Galeri in Caernarfon as I don't hold any of that information.